Discovery of Biomarkers

Development of proteomic methods for analysis of cerebrospinal fluid

Proteomic analysis of body fluids represents a real challenge due to the very large dynamic range of protein concentrations: basically, the vast majority of the protein content is represented by only one or a few proteins, which hinder the detection of low-abundant species. We have been involved in the testing of the Proteominer technology, which represents a powerful tool to go much deeper into the proteome characterization.

 

Proteomic analysis of CSF samples

  • Very large dynamic range of protein concentrations (1010), albumin = 45% of total protein
  • Low protein concentration : 0.40 mg/ml (200x less than serum)
  • Low available volume : Lumbar puncture = 1 to 2 mL
    • reduction of sample dynamic range using Proteominer beads
    • label-free quantitative analysis of small CSF samples
 

 

References

Mouton-Barbosa et al (2010) In-depth exploration of cerebrospinal fluid by combining peptide ligand library treatment and label-free protein quantification. Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 9, 1006-1021.
 

Clinical projects

  • Identification of biomarkers of obstructive nephropathy, a kidney pathology of newborn infants (Collaboration JP Schanstra and JL Bascands, Inserm, Toulouse)
  • Identification biomarkers of abdominal aortic aneurysms in plasma-derived microvesicles (Collaboration JL Martin-Ventura, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid)
  • Biomarkers for CNS relapse of diffuse large B cell lymphomas (Collaboration C. Thieblemont, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris)

Identification of obstructive nephropathy biomarkers in urine

References

Lacroix C et al (2014) Label-free quantitative urinary proteomics identifies the arginase pathway as a new player in congenital obstructive nephropathy. Molecular & cellular proteomics 13, 3421-3434.

Martinez-Pinna R et al (2014) Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of human plasma-derived microvesicles to find protein signatures of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Proteomics. Clinical applications 8, 620-625.